Bridging Research on Learning and Student Achievement

  • Two research studies on BSCS high school programs indicate that students learn more when teachers teach the programs as the authors intended (i.e., with fidelity).
  • In 1995, BSCS studied the implementation of BSCS Biology: A Human Approach and found that student gains, pretest to posttest, were significantly higher when teachers taught the program with fidelity than when teachers taught the program with low fidelity.
  • In 2002, BSCS studied the implementation of BSCS Science: An Inquiry Approach and found that student gains, pretest to posttest, were significantly higher when teachers taught the program with medium to high fidelity.
  • In the 2002 study, it was encouraging to see that even when teachers taught the program with low fidelity, students still learned from the program on their own, even though they did not learn as much. This speaks to the importance of high-quality instructional materials.
  • Article published in The Science Educator, Volume 16, Issue 2, 2007.

In this article, the authors describe results from two field-test studies conducted by BSCS, both of which indicate a strong relationship between fidelity of curriculum implementation and student learning gains.

To read the full report, visit The Science Educator, Volume 16, Issue 2, 2007.

Taylor, J. A., Van Scotter, P., & Coulson, D. (2007). Bridging Research on Learning and Student Achievement: The Role of Instructional Materials. Science Educator, 16(2), 44-50.